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Rethinking the Rubber Chicken

As a public relations and marketing professional, I have been working with nonprofits on their marketing, fundraising and PR efforts for more than 20 years. In the last decade there have been many changes to how nonprofits approach special events and fund raising.   One thing that hasn’t changed much is the amount of time and effort that goes into choosing the menu at the thousands of benefits and fundraisers being held across this country every day.  The all-important entree - what we refer to as the proverbial rubber chicken - is being contemplated and discussed at length as we speak by more people than watch “American Idol”.    I often marvel at the amount of man hours spent by hard working committees, development and special events staff trying to find exactly the right meal.  Now of course, if event donors are paying for a glamorous benefit evening the meal needs to be the best option available but an over-emphasis on the plate to me can be symptomatic of an organization that hasn’t recognized the subtle shifts that are happening within the donor community and events as a whole.

As the fight for donor dollars increase, organizations talk a lot about how hard it is to raise money.   This is in no small measure due to the saturation of events and annual campaigns for worthwhile organizations that have become so prevalent across the country.  Parties and philanthropy are popular like never before.  This is without question a good thing. 

However, in NYC alone, you can attend a gala every night of the year and rest assured most of them will follow a very similar agenda —cocktails, dinner, speech, dancing.  With so many events and requests for dollars, the amount of people who can attend is becoming more and more sought after.  As a result, the focus and refocus on details like the plate to see if they can possibly raise a little more money every year keeps increasing.  Forget the plate, take a good long hard look at your event, why you’re doing, what you are trying to communicate and why people should care.  It is of course, easier to repeat the same idea than to reinvent and risk but, any organization who has held the same event for more than five years running should mandate a re-evaluation of its formula not so they can throw out the whole idea but so that they can keep it fresh and exciting and appealing to its audience.    

To truly understand fundraising today, I believe it behooves all nonprofit professionals and volunteers to understand that there has been a huge cultural shift for donors over the last four years.  It began in 2008 as a reaction to purse tightening, but is now considered smart and informed giving.  Donors, big and small - because small donors who give every year are equally important - are choosing to focus their giving and their energy on fewer organizations, but are giving more.  Party hopping is less important than choosing an organization that reflects one’s own values and interests, allowing individuals or companies to identify with it and make an impact.  Let’s call it the “Bill and Melinda Gates effect”, instead of writing checks and asking their other powerful friends to write checks, Bill and Melinda as a team decided very deliberately to make themselves part of the process of finding answers. It has in fact, become their life’s work.  But you don’t have to be wealthy like Bill or Melinda to care, social media has galvanized and given a voice to the small donor who previously might have gotten lost in the mix.

Speaking to this highly informed donor regardless of size is, of course, more work and not easy to lock in with just a filet mignon dinner and a night of dancing.  But give them what they want and you will reap the rewards. Committed donors are going to events to learn about the organization, the community of people that supports it and sure, the pomp and circumstance is big part of the fun (no one likes a good party more than me; I chose it as a profession), but the progress of the mission has become the new star.   At the first Operation Smile benefit I attended as a donor a couple of years ago, a beautiful young woman came onto the stage and sang a song by Celine Dion.  When she was done, she said to the audience, “Twenty years ago, Operation Smile performed life changing surgery on me that enabled me to speak, smile and now sing, thank you for changing my life.”  There wasn’t a dry eye in the place.  I can’t tell you what I ate that night but I remember her vividly.

So when you are planning your format, consider this — a highly informed donor wants to know if their $250, $500, or $1,000 a ticket donation actually matters.    Does the event aspire to attract donors who care about its mission?  Does it aspire inspire action?  I was personally shocked that the KONY 2012 campaign organizers did not anticipate the scrutiny of their finances when their campaign took flight.   Nothing could have prepared them for the intensity of the spotlight they received but not having cogent answers at the ready for where all the money was going was a rookie mistake on a gigantic scale.

There is an old saying that everything that can be done has been done before which is just a funny way of saying history has much to teach us if we look for it.  For myself, one of my early mentors in my career was the social activist and beauty entrepreneur, Anita Roddick, founder of The Body Shop who was as unconventional as they come.  In her 40’s at the time when I worked for her, she was often telling me the 25 year old to shake things up.  In the early 90’s, the company launched the first national AIDS awareness campaign by a retail company.  The campaign, called Protect & Respect, was shot by Annie Leibovitz and included a diverse group of people with AIDS.  It was very controversial for the time and there was a tremendous amount of push back from the malls, franchisees scared of backlash and even some of the employees.   The company launched the campaign anyway and minds and hearts were opened.   I know I was.  We imagined and reimagined every scenario for backlash we possibly could.  Long before there was a term ‘haters’, we knew there would be people who would come out of the woodwork against the project.

Those faces in the campaign changed attitudes.  The ability of our consumers, people in our shops and corporate offices to identify with and in some cases meet one of the featured faces — a teenage girl who became our spokesperson and had gotten AIDS through a blood transfusion – was incredible. We were — I’m ashamed to admit — afraid to even touch her the first time we met her.  She was in our modern day society a leper.  But meeting her, like Princess Diana’s holding the hand of an AIDS patient, did more for me and the average mall goer than 1,000 rubber chicken dinners would have done at the time.

I was also lucky enough to meet the women who started the original Take Our Daughters To Work campaign, a program we adopted early on at The Body Shop.  Those women worked tirelessly before the age of social media to explain why mentoring girls mattered.  Once again we aligned with an idea and supported programming around it rather than focusing on the event and making the cause secondary. 

Anita was fond of saying, “Anyone can write a check, I’m interested in making a difference.”  So shake it up.  Stop worrying about the chicken and ask yourself what is the one message you want people walking out of that event with that day.

"Body Shop Starting a Campaign on AIDS." The New York Times, 28 Sept. 1993.

http://www.nytimes.com/1993/09/28/business/company-news-body-shop-starting-a-campaign-on-aids.html

The Body Shop team in 1993 in Times Square to Launch Protect and Respect

SOFA NEW YORK

With a new design scheme and an exciting roster of

international dealers,The Sculpture Objects & Functional Art Fair (SOFA NEW YORK) celebrates its 15th anniversary.

 

The 2nd annual LongHouse Reserve Special Recognition Awards for Best Artwork in Show and Best Booth Design will be presented by Jack Lenor Larsen at the 5th annual invitation-only Designer Breakfast Preview, Friday, April 20.


 


Larsen’s  name is synonymous with twentieth-century textiles, 
and is one
 of only four Americans honored with a retrospective at the Palais Du Louvre, Paris. Along with Jack, judging the artwork and booths will be Jamie Drake, New York-based designer, and Emily Zilber, curator of decorative arts at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston. 

 

SOFA Tour to LongHouse 

Previewing the major exhibition, Accumulations: NOW with 500 works in craft media from the last 100 years. Jack Lenor Larsen will lead tours on Saturday, April 21st at 12 noon and at 2 pm including a delicious box lunch. LongHouse will be open especially for this tour featuring Spring gardens full of newly installed sculpture. A special bus will depart the Armory at 9am Saturday, returning by 6 o’clock. Cost is $150 complete; $120 for LongHouse members. 


A Taste of Summer from Chef Marc Weber

Chef Marc Weber taught us how to serve up a family friendly dish for the warmer weather.  See below for his personal recipe!

Gazpacho
8 plum tomatoes
1 english cucumber, peeled
2 red bell peppers
1/8 -1/4 red onion (depending on size)
1 clove of garlic
2 teaspoon kosher salt
3 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon sherry vinegar
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
2 teaspoon sugar
20 leaves of basil

Preparation:
Chop the tomatoes, cucumbers, red peppers and onion into 1-inch cubes and put in food processor or blender, along with remaining ingredients. Pulse to preferred consistency.
Optional Add-ins:
Peppers, onions, tomatoes, basil, scallions, cucumbers, sour cream, shrimp, crabmeat, croutons, etc. For more spicy from raw garlic or jalapeno. Sriracha (Asian hot sauce)

Garlic croutons
Toast slices of baguette that have been brushed with olive oil and seasoned with salt and pepper.  When they come out of the oven rub with a raw garlic clove.
Crabmeat Salad  - buy cooked crabmeat, mix lemon and oil and add to  directly to the gazpacho.

Founded in 2006 by chef Marc Weber, On the Marc Events goes beyond the traditional approach to catering by adding its unique flavor. The company customizes every event to match a client’s tastes, style and budget. Chef Weber’s creative vision and entrepreneurial spirit has enabled the company to expand each year, building a brand know for originality, exceptional hospitality, above all, exquisite taste. They don’t believe in standard menus - ever. For more information, please visit www.onthemarcevents.com

SOPHIE B HAWKINS SPRING TOUR HITS LONG ISLAND, PHILADELPHIA & NEW YORK CITY

 CONCERTS BENEFIT LOCAL CHARITIES — NYSPCC & OPERATION SMILE

 

NEW ALBUM THE CROSSING LAUNCHES JUNE 19TH

 

NEXT TOUR DATE IS MARCH 24TH FOR THE ASPEN SONGWRITERS FESTIVAL

New York, NY — Grammy nominated singer/songwriter and New York City native Sophie B Hawkins hit the East Coast this past weekend with concerts in Bay Shore, Long Island, Philadelphia, PA and the Iridium in New York City.  She also gave a surprise performance at the Canal Room to an enthusiastic room of 90’s music fans.  She performed music from her new album at her concerts — The Crossing —  which is her first album released in more than five years and will launch June 19th nationwide.  Sophie and her incredible voice have long been compared to Janis Joplin and she brought down the house with her covers of Piece of My Heart and Cry Baby on her tour. 

 

Two of the concerts benefited charities Ms. Hawkins is affiliated with — Operation Smile for the Philadelphia concert and the New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NYSPCC) for the NYC Iridium concerts. Sophie, best known for her ’92 hit Damn I Wish I Was Your Lover and the blockbuster As I Lay Me Down is releasing The Crossing June 19th with a limited number of CDs sold exclusively at each of the concerts.   Next up, Sophie plays at the Aspen Songwriters Festival March 24th.  This past December, her song Life is a Bomb was part of Gary Marshall’s New Year’s Eve soundtrack. 

 

Notable attendees at the New York City and Philadelphia shows included:  Doug Denoff Broadway Producer,Craig Haffner Broadway Producer, Thomm Hopke,  V.P of Harper Collins Publishing, Joe Allen of famed NY restaurant Joe Allen’s, Tony nominated composer Steve Orich, Broadway producer Steve Orisch, fashion exec Amy Rosi & her partner Peter Rosenthal, publicist Lisa Lori and her husband Mat Lori, Dr. Mary Pulido of the NYSPCC and her husband; and Lauri Catena of Operation Smile and her husband. 

 

Follow Sophie at @therealsophieb or find her on Facebook.  For a free download of her new single or info about the tour or THE CROSSING, Love Yourself, visit her website www.sophiebhawkins.com

 

Press Inquiries:  Joanna Scholtz, Lisa Lori Communicatins —  203-228-5090 — scholtz@lisalori.com

 

LONGHOUSE RESERVE WINTER BENEFIT

Wednesday, February 15, 2012  End Stage TheatreSignature Center, 480 West 42nd Street

 

LongHouse Reserve will hold their Winter Benefit, a revival of Edward Albee’s The Lady from Dubuque starring Jane Alexander in Manhattan at the Signature Center on 42nd Street.

 

Peter Wilson and Scott Sanders will host cocktails and dinner in their private home.  After, there will be transportation provided so guests can attend a special performance by Mr. Albee.

 

Time: Cocktails & Dinner 5:30; Play 7:30

Tickets: Premium $175, Benefactor $500 and Underwriter $750

Press Inquiries: Joanna Scholtz scholtz@lisalori.com 203.228.5090

New Year’s Eve Soundtrack featuring Sophie B. Hawkins’ “Life Is A Bomb”


Give the gift of music with the soundtrack to Garry Marshall’s ensemble comedNew Year’s Eve. The album is available on iTunes on December 6 and includes a number of songs from the movie by artists including Jon Bon Jovi, actress Lea Michele, Kate York, Goo Goo Dolls, P!nk, Katie Herzig, Charles Brown, Duncan and Sophie B. Hawkins. 


PR is a Team Sport
Every day the headlines tell us how hard things are for so many people, companies and organizations.  When the first recession hit in 2008, our business was no exception.  I thought at the time, wow, not even 2002 – after 9/11, was as difficult as this.  I began to dread emails that said, “Lisa do you have 5 minutes to talk?” because I knew what was coming.  After all, for many companies public relations is viewed as discretionary (despite the fact they need it during hard times more than ever) and so we saw many of our clients dramatically reduce our budgets or tell us they lost their job and virtually entire departments were being dissolved.  It was a tough year all around.  In the last 18 months, however, LLC has seen a dramatic turnaround and although we have been spinning from the whirl wind of activity, there has also been time to reflect on why our business is doing better and what we have learned from it.  Overwhelming, it has been the strength of our team at all levels that has helped us recover and flourish despite the difficult environment.  The team’s ability to work together, respect each other and get the job done gives you the best results but also attracts the best clients.  Sounds easy to achieve but when dealing with people ‘capital’ it can be extremely tricky.  Here are a few lessons from the last 18 months.
In retail, there is a saying ‘location, location, location’.  In PR, it should be talent, talent, talent.  Finding the best talent at all levels is extremely hard but this market has enlarged the talent pool of who is available.  It has given agencies a diverse array of prospects to choose from rather than just those that are available right now.  Still the chances of making poor employee choices are high.  In PR, you win an account and you might need to staff it tomorrow.  I’ve learned rash hiring like this can be terrible for the employee and us.  Rather than go through the pain of hiring and letting people go when the relationship goes south, it is far better to gracefully turn away clients so that we can continue to provide excellent service to our existing clients.  We can then add new business after we’ve found the best new employees.  This slows growth in the short term but in the long term strengthens your team, reputation and your results.  
In one of my former jobs, I worked for an innovative company called The Body Shop and for a true talent founder Anita Roddick.  She created a questionnaire for prospective employees that was more of a personality test than a review of your resume and the goal was to see what kind of values you had and if you were right for the company.  This caused more than a few employees to snicker that it really had nothing to do with credentials and shouldn’t be done.  In my old age, I am starting to see the wisdom of this questionnaire and wondering if we too shouldn’t have a quiz for prospective employees about their motivation for work, applying to our company and what kind of work ethic they have.  Personality, values and motivation can be as important as education, credentials and ambition.  If you’re smart but arrogant, trained but uninspired, ambitious but selfish you’re not going to do me much good.  Think about it.  Leader or follower?  
PR agencies love the rush that winning a new client gives them but what about the agency picking the client.  Ridiculous you think?  Not really.  Vetting prospective clients is possible.  This past year, our growth has been deliberate and steady partly because we want to provide excellent service and partly because we are wary of increasing our payroll.  That means working hard to grow our existing business first and cultivate new prospects second.  New business is far more time consuming and risky.  However, we all want and need new business so when we get those calls, rather than tell them anything is possible, we try to interview them extensively to see what their expectations are, budget, timelines and most importantly, if we can hit it out of the park with them.  Of course, there will always be variables we can’t anticipate, politics being the most significant, but we can make sure there is a commitment on the client side to success and work to achieve it.  We aren’t interested in being a vendor but a partner and if our client agrees with this, we have the tools for success.  If we see any trouble spots such as the ‘we can’t pay your regular fees now but we will grow’ we have just got to walk away.  I can’t pay our employees with future promises so I can’t take on clients who can’t pay our fees.
Finally, a genuinely hungry college intern or grad vs. the best educated one usually make far better employees.  I know this may fly in the face of everything we think about how to get ahead in this world.  I personally want to have my children go to the best schools but if they don’t have that drive to succeed on their own it will be an expensive and futile exercise in my opinion.  When I moved our offices from NYC to surburban CT, I knew it would be harder to find entry level or intern talent of the caliber of NYC university kids but I never anticipated it would be because kids just weren’t hungry enough for the work.  The big difference?  Living at your parent’s suburban home rent free vs. toughing it out in NYC.  Parents do their college kids or college grads no favors by paying their cell phone bills, car payments or buying them closets full of designer clothing.  I recently had a father call me to ask me to reissue his daughter’s intern check that she had failed to cash for a full year because she ‘needed’ the money.  When I told him he should have his daughter deal with her job instead of him, he said ‘ you know kids these days, a 19 or 20 year old doesn’t  understand banks’.   
Really?  In 12 years of owning my business, I have never had a vendor or employee fail to cash a check.  With so many young people living at their parents houses, driving cars their parent pay for etc. etc… it is difficult for them to need and understand the value of money.  Instead of thinking of it in terms of rent and food as I did when I was starting out, they think in terms of handbags and shoes.  As an employer competing with this cultural shift, it is difficult to make 20 somethings understand why their entry level salary won’t cover their own one bedroom doorman building or explain why their showing up late every day is costing me and our clients money.   Our 20 something’s pay their bills, they value their money so they value mine.
Yes, times have been tough for small business over the past two years but that means taking a cold hard look at business choices all around.  It is hard to get a job out of college, it is damn hard to start a business and even harder to fire people, but there is also a clarity to the work now.  There is not the luxury of making poor choices.  Are you willing to make the sacrifices, do what it takes to succeed at that job or are you only interested in living the lavish life that you think you are due?  Look around at the tracks of most of the successful people you read about, I’m talking about great men like the late Steve Jobs or the next generation of fashion ladies like the founders of Rent The Runway or Gilt Group – great ideas, innovations take hard work.  Values our immigrant predecessors understood and came to America for.  Instead I hear intelligent people tell me about how that family of women on reality television are brilliant businesswomen, we all know how they catapulted themselves into the public sphere and it isn’t pretty.  We need to emphasis substance over style in more ways than one.
I wish instead young women would look to one of my idols – Kathy Giusti, founder and CEO of the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF).  Kathy and the MMRF are world renowned for changing the way cancer research is conducted and for challenging the medical establishment.  Oh, and she did this after she was diagnosed with cancer.  Kathy was recently profiled in the book The Humanitarian Leader in Each of Us which makes a persuasive case that anyone with motivation, energy and perseverance can take charge of making a difference in society.  Kathy is that rare breed of excellence (she is a grad of HBS) and perseverance coupled with a humanity that we all should emulate.  
Happy Thanksgiving.  

PR is a Team Sport

Every day the headlines tell us how hard things are for so many people, companies and organizations.  When the first recession hit in 2008, our business was no exception.  I thought at the time, wow, not even 2002 – after 9/11, was as difficult as this.  I began to dread emails that said, “Lisa do you have 5 minutes to talk?” because I knew what was coming.  After all, for many companies public relations is viewed as discretionary (despite the fact they need it during hard times more than ever) and so we saw many of our clients dramatically reduce our budgets or tell us they lost their job and virtually entire departments were being dissolved.  It was a tough year all around.  In the last 18 months, however, LLC has seen a dramatic turnaround and although we have been spinning from the whirl wind of activity, there has also been time to reflect on why our business is doing better and what we have learned from it.  Overwhelming, it has been the strength of our team at all levels that has helped us recover and flourish despite the difficult environment.  The team’s ability to work together, respect each other and get the job done gives you the best results but also attracts the best clients.  Sounds easy to achieve but when dealing with people ‘capital’ it can be extremely tricky.  Here are a few lessons from the last 18 months.

In retail, there is a saying ‘location, location, location’.  In PR, it should be talent, talent, talent.  Finding the best talent at all levels is extremely hard but this market has enlarged the talent pool of who is available.  It has given agencies a diverse array of prospects to choose from rather than just those that are available right now.  Still the chances of making poor employee choices are high.  In PR, you win an account and you might need to staff it tomorrow.  I’ve learned rash hiring like this can be terrible for the employee and us.  Rather than go through the pain of hiring and letting people go when the relationship goes south, it is far better to gracefully turn away clients so that we can continue to provide excellent service to our existing clients.  We can then add new business after we’ve found the best new employees.  This slows growth in the short term but in the long term strengthens your team, reputation and your results. 

In one of my former jobs, I worked for an innovative company called The Body Shop and for a true talent founder Anita Roddick.  She created a questionnaire for prospective employees that was more of a personality test than a review of your resume and the goal was to see what kind of values you had and if you were right for the company.  This caused more than a few employees to snicker that it really had nothing to do with credentials and shouldn’t be done.  In my old age, I am starting to see the wisdom of this questionnaire and wondering if we too shouldn’t have a quiz for prospective employees about their motivation for work, applying to our company and what kind of work ethic they have.  Personality, values and motivation can be as important as education, credentials and ambition.  If you’re smart but arrogant, trained but uninspired, ambitious but selfish you’re not going to do me much good.  Think about it.  Leader or follower? 

PR agencies love the rush that winning a new client gives them but what about the agency picking the client.  Ridiculous you think?  Not really.  Vetting prospective clients is possible.  This past year, our growth has been deliberate and steady partly because we want to provide excellent service and partly because we are wary of increasing our payroll.  That means working hard to grow our existing business first and cultivate new prospects second.  New business is far more time consuming and risky.  However, we all want and need new business so when we get those calls, rather than tell them anything is possible, we try to interview them extensively to see what their expectations are, budget, timelines and most importantly, if we can hit it out of the park with them.  Of course, there will always be variables we can’t anticipate, politics being the most significant, but we can make sure there is a commitment on the client side to success and work to achieve it.  We aren’t interested in being a vendor but a partner and if our client agrees with this, we have the tools for success.  If we see any trouble spots such as the ‘we can’t pay your regular fees now but we will grow’ we have just got to walk away.  I can’t pay our employees with future promises so I can’t take on clients who can’t pay our fees.

Finally, a genuinely hungry college intern or grad vs. the best educated one usually make far better employees.  I know this may fly in the face of everything we think about how to get ahead in this world.  I personally want to have my children go to the best schools but if they don’t have that drive to succeed on their own it will be an expensive and futile exercise in my opinion.  When I moved our offices from NYC to surburban CT, I knew it would be harder to find entry level or intern talent of the caliber of NYC university kids but I never anticipated it would be because kids just weren’t hungry enough for the work.  The big difference?  Living at your parent’s suburban home rent free vs. toughing it out in NYC.  Parents do their college kids or college grads no favors by paying their cell phone bills, car payments or buying them closets full of designer clothing.  I recently had a father call me to ask me to reissue his daughter’s intern check that she had failed to cash for a full year because she ‘needed’ the money.  When I told him he should have his daughter deal with her job instead of him, he said ‘ you know kids these days, a 19 or 20 year old doesn’t  understand banks’.   

Really?  In 12 years of owning my business, I have never had a vendor or employee fail to cash a check.  With so many young people living at their parents houses, driving cars their parent pay for etc. etc… it is difficult for them to need and understand the value of money.  Instead of thinking of it in terms of rent and food as I did when I was starting out, they think in terms of handbags and shoes.  As an employer competing with this cultural shift, it is difficult to make 20 somethings understand why their entry level salary won’t cover their own one bedroom doorman building or explain why their showing up late every day is costing me and our clients money.   Our 20 something’s pay their bills, they value their money so they value mine.

Yes, times have been tough for small business over the past two years but that means taking a cold hard look at business choices all around.  It is hard to get a job out of college, it is damn hard to start a business and even harder to fire people, but there is also a clarity to the work now.  There is not the luxury of making poor choices.  Are you willing to make the sacrifices, do what it takes to succeed at that job or are you only interested in living the lavish life that you think you are due?  Look around at the tracks of most of the successful people you read about, I’m talking about great men like the late Steve Jobs or the next generation of fashion ladies like the founders of Rent The Runway or Gilt Group – great ideas, innovations take hard work.  Values our immigrant predecessors understood and came to America for.  Instead I hear intelligent people tell me about how that family of women on reality television are brilliant businesswomen, we all know how they catapulted themselves into the public sphere and it isn’t pretty.  We need to emphasis substance over style in more ways than one.

I wish instead young women would look to one of my idols – Kathy Giusti, founder and CEO of the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF).  Kathy and the MMRF are world renowned for changing the way cancer research is conducted and for challenging the medical establishment.  Oh, and she did this after she was diagnosed with cancer.  Kathy was recently profiled in the book The Humanitarian Leader in Each of Us which makes a persuasive case that anyone with motivation, energy and perseverance can take charge of making a difference in society.  Kathy is that rare breed of excellence (she is a grad of HBS) and perseverance coupled with a humanity that we all should emulate. 

Happy Thanksgiving.  

The Contemporary Eau de Cologne, a new fragrance line, will launch at Bergdorf Goodman in New York City and Neiman Marcus in Houston, Bal Harbour, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Chicago, and Coral Gables the week of October 23, 2011. Created by THIRDMAN, the confidential entity behind the launch, the line translates the long standing tradition of scented waters, or Eaux de Cologne, for today: modern formulae with the highest grade natural essences, stored in large bottles and meant to be splashed on liberally. Both for man and woman, the scents by THIRDMAN, are uncommon and indispensable.

The first scent in the collection, Eau Monumentale, is available at Bergdorf Goodman and Neiman Marcus in 50ml for $75, 250ml for $150, and 500ml for $250.